Wolf in White Van, by John Darnielle

Review:

Wolf in White Van - John Darnielle

I’ve waited a couple days to write this review because this book puzzled me, and I wondered if it was the author’s fault or mine. It’s silly to assign blame when one doesn’t like a book; I suppose this one just wasn’t for me, and I wish every book was.

On the surface, and based on the sample, this book seemed very much “me.” The protagonist runs a small, one-person, mail-order game company. His most popular game, Trace Italian, a text-based RPG, brought to mind both my own (brief) history as a D&D player, as well as the epic adventure of Ready Player One. The game here functions as a refuge for its creator–I was fascinated by the fact that no one has ever made it to the Trace Italian, or fortress that would provide safety in a post-apocalyptic Midwestern U.S., nor is anyone likely to–borne of months spent in the hospital after a mysterious “accident.” The game also embodies what I understand to be the book’s major theme: how the decisions we make may have no real explanation or cannot be anticipated, including their consequences. For example, Sean, the protagonist, cannot anticipate how two young players will treat the game as too real, leading to one spoke of the plot, or how another player will make a choice I imagine Sean envies.

The book is structured so that its major plot points are only slowly revealed as you go; for example, about a quarter of the way through, the reader learns what exactly happened with the two young players that ended up embroiling Sean in a lawsuit. It isn’t until the final pages of the book that one learns what happened the night of Sean’s “accident,” though why is much more complicated. In this way the structure is closer to that of a mystery…except it’s not a mystery novel. It made me feel manipulated; while all storytelling is manipulation, in a way, this sort of teasing of what you’re even reading about frustrates me. I tried to imagine the book structured differently and admit it would be a completely different novel. I don’t have an answer as to what I want and can only conclude, again, that this is not a book for me.

As I read, I anticipated the ending accurately but hoped it might somehow still satisfy by then; it didn’t. A book can be about roads we do and don’t take, how our choices don’t always have rational (or even irrational) reasons, but it still has to work as a story rather than shrug its shoulders. It strikes me that I might have loved this book as a short story, where less of a build-up would lead to less frustration.

Original post:
eevilalice.booklikes.com/post/1563615/wolf-in-white-van-by-john-darnielle

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Wolf in White Van, by John Darnielle

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