The Fire Next Time, by James Baldwin

Review:

The Fire Next Time - James Baldwin

There they (police officers) stood, in twos and threes and fours, in their Cub Scout uniforms and with their Cub Scout faces, totally unprepared, as is the way with American he-men, for anything that could not be settled with a club or a fist or a gun.

Terrible how much this text is still relevant, might have been written today. This would not have surprised Baldwin–he acknowledges more than once that things may never change in America–though I imagine it might have saddened him.

The Fire Next Time contains two separate nonfiction pieces, one a letter to Baldwin’s nephew, the sort of message or discussion African Americans have with their younger family members that white people don’t. The second is an elegant “Letter from a Region in My Mind” that explores the author’s coming to (and leaving) religion as a way to discuss race and racism in America. It is, ostensibly, a solution, though perhaps an impossible one.

I couldn’t possibly capture Baldwin’s argument in a brief synopsis, nor do I want to. His prose is beautiful and crystal clear, unflinching yet humane. He’s my favorite kind of arguer, one who acknowledges from where other points of view are coming while advocating for his own position. It’s been too long since I first read him, and I won’t make that mistake again.

Original post:
eevilalice.booklikes.com/post/1668546/the-fire-next-time-by-james-baldwin

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The Fire Next Time, by James Baldwin

2 thoughts on “The Fire Next Time, by James Baldwin

  1. mia says:

    I just finished this book and I’m in awe of it. And thank you for sharing this. I really think “crystal clear” is the way to describe both his prose and his being

    Liked by 1 person

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