Another Country, by James Baldwin

Review:

Another Country - James Baldwin

“So what can we really do for each other except–just love each other and be each other’s witness?”

When I finished Another Country, it brought tears to my eyes. There’s so much suffering exquisitely depicted alongside glimmers of love and beauty, such whole, flawed characters. Like the recently read The Fire Next Time, a nonfiction work by Baldwin, it might have been written today. Again, this is both a compliment to Baldwin’s art and his powers of observation but also a lament that so little has changed, particularly regarding race but also gender and sexuality.

Nothing is easy about this book except its gorgeous, lucid prose. It’s not afraid of the dark things in people, the mistakes we make, and what holds us back. I felt deeply for these characters, but the book doesn’t give in to despair, which, at the end, is what made me cry in relief.

I was surprised to be reminded of Virginia Woolf as I read. There are passages where a character’s inability to express “it” or oneself or story are noted. There’s a suicide. There’s also something about the way both Baldwin and Woolf capture fine states of emotion or the way our feelings and attitude can change so quickly, from seemingly small things. And, when we learn Cass’s real name is Clarissa (her husband is Richard), I knew I wasn’t crazy to make these connections!

The book is a landmark queer text, and Baldwin clearly knows how to write sex, the act itself–between men and women and between two men–and desire. Its queerness affected its reception at the time; I’m sure many would prefer Baldwin stick exclusively to race and racism. The quote above is spoken by Vivaldo to Eric, and it is a beautiful and simple idea even as the story proves it may be impossible to live by.

However, Baldwin does privilege love between men and the homosocial above all. Nearly all the central male characters are queer or explore their sexuality with one another; at the very least, platonic love between them is a source of comfort and hope. This is not the case with the women. Women’s sexuality and power emasculate or cannot be known. There appears to be no escape or solution for women and their pain and oppression, whether white or black. If there is one flaw or problematic issue in this book, in my mind it’s that. The love and act of witnessing in the quote seem to be for men only.

 

 

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Another Country, by James Baldwin

The Discreet Hero, Mario Vargas Llosa, trans. Edith Grossman

Review:

The Discreet Hero: A Novel - Mario Vargas Llosa, Edith Grossman

This book put me in a bind: while I found the story and characters engaging, fun, even, there are aspects that offended me. As I read, I would wonder: “Is this attitude or behavior endorsed by the author, or just described by him in depicting this place and these personalities?” By the end, I decided that there are definite ideologies at work here, including the beliefs that when it comes to family, blood is all; that the younger generation is responsible for squandering the hard work of their parents’; and the conservative viewpoint that if one only works hard enough, one can be successful. Other troubling attitudes that are questioned by characters but nevertheless feel condoned by the narrative: blaming victims of rape or sexual coercion; treating women as objects; racism; masculine pride as more important than the lives of loved ones.

After I finished the book, I read several reviews as I tried to work out my opinion of it. These mention that Vargas Llosa won the Nobel Prize for Literature but that this may not be his best work; that he used to be a social progressive but became a conservative who ran for president of Peru; that some characters appear in other books of his; that some elements are based on real events and his own life.

The book is divided between two alternating and converging narratives with separate protagonists, both fitting the “discreet hero” label of the title. The stories take place in two different areas of Peru, one Lima, one provincial, and their plots appear to have no connection. When they link up, it’s very satisfying, even though the connection is quite minor. Each plot has elements of a mystery-thriller that propel the story; I found it hard to put down. The characters are often charming and easy to root for (until they’re not). In story one, a man who worked his way up from nothing and owns a transport company is anonymously threatened unless he pays for protection; he refuses. In story two, a man on the verge of retirement and a long-awaited trip with his wife and son finds his life upheaved when his wealthy boss decides to marry his servant to punish his errant sons; at the same time, the protagonist’s teenaged son is being approached by a mysterious stranger who may or may not be real, the devil, an angel, or just the kid fucking with his parents (this last mystery is left ambiguous).

Other elements I enjoyed included the relationship between the second protagonist and his wife, his feelings about art’s role in life, the police sergeant from the first story, and learning about Peruvian life across two settings.

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The Discreet Hero, Mario Vargas Llosa, trans. Edith Grossman

So btw the new Ghostbusters is pretty awesome.

ghostbusters-2016

I’ve been excited about Paul Feig’s all-women Ghostbusters since I first read about it. I say this as a fan of the original, which came out when I was a kid, as a fan of Feig’s since Freaks and Geeks, and as a fan of the funny ladies who make up the new team–Kristen Wiig, Melissa McCarthy, Leslie Jones, and Kate McKinnon, in case you’ve been hiding under a rock. Of course, I couldn’t just be excited as a fan; immediately a minority of butthurt fanboys felt the need to spend effort trashing a movie they hadn’t seen before it was even released (and continue to do so now that it has been). Because there aren’t worse things in the world going on.

Continue reading “So btw the new Ghostbusters is pretty awesome.”

So btw the new Ghostbusters is pretty awesome.