White Tears, by Hari Kunzru

Review:

White Tears - Hari Kunzru

It was difficult to read the first half or so of this book because the protagonist (Seth) and his best (and only) friend (Carter) are aggravatingly ignorant of their appropriation of black culture. They’re even more offensive for thinking they’re woke or genuine in their fetishistic consumption of the rarest blues, at least in Carter’s case. Seth is less than sympathetic in his own distinct way; he’s such a follower that he barely has a personality of his own. As little as I could bear the privileged Carter, Seth is consequently even harder for me to care about given that he follows Carter like a puppy. I don’t know what to make of the fact that both have or have had mental health issues. And I don’t know what to make of Seth’s thing for Carter’s sister.

I patiently waited for these guys to get some sort of comeuppance. When it came, it was a whirlwind of genres, a mishmash of past and present, a blurring of identities. Formally, stylistically, this novel took off, grabbing me by the collar. It was hard to put down. I hadn’t known what to expect at the beginning, which is a gift for a reader. I do think at times the cues or signals were overdone; we could have been better trusted to follow the shifts in time and perspective. But what a ride.

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White Tears, by Hari Kunzru

Pachinko, by Min Jin Lee

Review:

Pachinko - Min Jin Lee

It took me almost four months to read Pachinko. As I read, I began wondering about my slow pace. My fall semesters are busier, yes, but I still manage to finish most books in what’s a timely manner for me. It certainly wasn’t because I found the book hard to read in terms of comprehension or engagement. As I got closer to the end, I realized: it was because I was so invested in the characters and storytelling I had to take time to process the intense feelings the novel evoked. There are also regular gaps in time that take place between chapters where characters’ situations change significantly; I needed mental space before diving into the story again. I can’t think of another novel that required this sort of reading from me.

In addition to Rushdie’s The Moor’s Last Sigh, Pachinko has served to establish that “family sagas” can engage me, or at least when another culture is involved. Through the family portrayed here, I learned more about Korea, but it never feels like a history lesson. Everything comes from the characters. The novel also provokes thought about national and racial identity.

There were moments I dreaded, as with the return of a less sympathetic character, though not in a way that made me dislike the novel or its author. There were moments that shocked me to the point of gasping. There are many scenes that easily and vividly come to mind when I recall my reading, which I finished more than a month ago.

I would love to teach this novel. I have the feeling I may reread it some day, regardless. For me, that’s a rarity, a compliment, and a sign of deep gratitude.

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Pachinko, by Min Jin Lee

Version Control, by Dexter Palmer

Review:

Version Control: A Novel - Dexter Palmer

I’m seeing a theme in this year’s Tournament of Books shortlist (or, I should say, those books whose samples appealed to me): genre-bending and concerns about identity. I like to think about the lines between or blurring genres, and I appreciate the lens of race or sexuality, both of which are commonly excluded from much genre fic.

Dexter Palmer’s Version Control is speculative, but only just: its future is near, and there are certainly elements that are not at all far-fetched and therefore frightening: self-driving cars that can endanger passengers when, say, a firmware update has a glitch; data mining and what it could be used for; digital avatars, operating much like bot accounts on social media sites. There are also reminders for our own present, such as the real goals of online dating services–to keep you using (and paying) as long as possible, not successfully find a partner.

Palmer’s novel is marketed as “time travel like you’ve never seen it before.” I’ll go ahead and preface my questions about and problems with the book by saying I’m easily confused by time travel narratives, no matter how well explained.

The book is structurally tight, with thematic echoes across points of view and timelines, of which there are two. The idea of “the best of all possible worlds” is central; when it’s inevitably discovered that the device the protagonist’s husband is working on is, well, working, despite a lack of scientific proof, the characters realize what we as readers learned about halfway through the book when details of their lives change (character x is dead instead of y; characters go–or don’t go–by certain nicknames; character a cheats with character b rather than c, etc.): every time someone enters the “causation violation” chamber, a new timeline branches off.

Before the characters themselves are in the know, in the first timeline explored, the protagonist feels something’s not right, but can’t explain what. She’s not alone; the phenomenon is experienced by others and has become a diagnosis. What I don’t understand is why they have that sense of wrongness. I was also confused by Sean, the physicist and protagonist’s son. Is his mural as his mother, Rebecca, sees it, or as Alicia sees (or doesn’t see) it? Is he simply an artistic child suffering from loss?

Though thematically sound with some fresh explorations of gender and race in the hard sciences especially, Version Control didn’t quite come together for me. I didn’t particularly like or care about any of the characters; I’d say Carson was most interesting to me. The end was fairly predictable; I enjoyed the first half more. I have some stylistic quibbles that are just my bias, like chunks or pages of dialog, which reminded me of exposition in movies, and what felt like unnecessary section breaks. But I wanted to know what happened next, and the mystery of what was going on and why definitely kept me reading.

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Version Control, by Dexter Palmer